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FocaalBlog is associated with Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology. It aims to accelerate and intensify anthropological conversations beyond what a regular academic journal can do, and to make them more widely, globally, and swiftly available.

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Conversations on the Left

  • David Bozzini: Gabriella Coleman on the ethnography of digital politics – part 2

    David Bozzini is a research fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY, where he is researching on Eritrean deserters movements and on the resistance to digital surveillance. He co-edits Tsantsa, the journal of the Swiss Ethnological Society. Gabriella Coleman is an anthropologist and holds the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy at McGill University in… more...

  • David Bozzini: Gabriella Coleman on the ethnography of digital politics – part 1

    David Bozzini is a research fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY, where he is researching on Eritrean deserters movements and on the resistance to digital surveillance. He co-edits Tsantsa, the journal of the Swiss Ethnological Society. Gabriella Coleman is an anthropologist and holds the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy at McGill University in… more...

  • Zoltán Glück: Of politics and crowds: A conversation with Susan Buck-Morss

    This interview with Susan Buck-Morss took place at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center on May 12 2015. Buck-Morss is Distinguished Professor of Political Philosophy at the Graduate Center and has been a towering figure in continental theory since her publication of The Origin of Negative Dialectics in 1977. Her books include… more...

  • Ida Susser: From the underground resistance under Franco to Podemos, with Vicente Navarro

    Vicente Navarro is a leading analyst of the history and origins of the financial crisis in Spain (and Europe in general) and an economic adviser to Podemos. His book There Are Alternatives (Hay Alternativas: Propuestas para Crear Empleo y Bienestar Social en España), written with economists Juan Torres and Alberto Garzón, became an inspiration to… more...

  • Zoltán Glück: Archive of a Radical Geographer: Neil Smith’s Papers—An Interview with Don Mitchell

    In 2014, Don Mitchell was a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Advanced Research Collaborative, at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). His primary project during this time was to sort through the large collection of papers, files, clippings, and correspondences left behind by Neil Smith after his untimely death in… more...

  • Zoltán Glück: Focaal Interview with David Harvey – Part 2

    The Conversations on the Left project by Focaal opens its series with an interview with David Harvey, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the CUNY Graduate Center. David Harvey’s works have had a profound impact on the direction of leftist social science over the past four decades. A few months before this interview, in May 2013, an impressive… more...

  • Zoltán Glück: Focaal Interview with David Harvey

    The Conversations on the Left project by Focaal opens its series with an interview with David Harvey, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the CUNY Graduate Center. David Harvey’s works have had a profound impact on the direction of leftist social science over the past four decades. A few months before this interview, in… more...

Features

Anthropologists on the EU at 60

Editor: Don Kalb

On 25 March 2017, the EU celebrated the 60th birthday of the Treaty of Rome—this, at a time when the European Union is more contested than ever, and indeed more contested every day. Brexit, the euro, the PIGS, the Balkans, the Visegrad Bloc, Russia and Ukraine, North Africa, Syria, ISIS, mass immigration, security, economic stagnation, youth unemployment, illiberal mobilizations, xenophobia, identity politics, social inequalities, “the white working class,” cultural integration, negative interest rates, borders, a US presidency that appears to want to pulverize it: the list of simultaneous crises is nothing less than terrifying. A strong, coherent, and centralized state bureaucracy led by a solid government would be paralyzed confronted by a similar list of simultaneous threats. The EU is the opposite of such an apparatus and has never been furnished with the financial, fiscal, political, bureaucratic, and legal resources that would allow her to deal competently and effectively with any of these troubles, let alone with all of them at once. Thus, it muddles through by default, solving little, afraid even to put the issues in all honesty on the table, hesitantly kicking the can down the road. Its 60th birthday is an occasion for us to reflect on this singular experiment in transnational quasi-state forms: from the problems of national, multiple, and European identities to inequalities, exclusions, marginalities, neoliberalism, cosmopolitanism, global capitalism, and shifting borders.

Contents